Listen to your children

“Dinner is very important in our family. We will even make dinner later if necessary so that we can all eat together. We have never had TV, although we did borrow one for the Olympics, but then we gave it back when they were over. During dinner I usually start with one child and ask that person to tell us all about their day. That way they all get to have a go at being focused on either once in three days or more often. Of course if they don’t want to talk about that day we let them pass.” – Geoff Creelman, consulting manager in computing.

  • Focusing on one child at a time teaches your other children to listen and care about what is happening to their siblings.
  • Be sure that you take a turn to share as well. Let your children listen to your day the same way you listen to theirs.
  • This family time of sharing will create more caring and considerate children.

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Activities:

Take each of your kids out regularly for ‘dad dates’

‘Dad dates’ (no other adults, no other kids) don’t have to be elaborate or expensive, but what they do need to be is time spent together.

Tips:

Keep track of your child’s events

Arrange your work schedule around your child’s important events whenever possible.