Dads and Kids funspiration

When school’s out – enjoy spending time with your kids, rather than endeavouring to ‘entertain’ them.

If you need to stay home but want to have quality fun time – ask them what they want to do and give some of your own ideas too – choose together and make a whole day of it.

Deciding is half the fun; but here are some ideas to get you started…

  • Craft – painting, drawing, beading, pottery, play dough.
  • More creativity – dress ups, story writing / telling, build a pillow fort, bake, build with lego or recyclables, make puppets and plan a show.
  • More inside – plan a project, adventure or a trip for the future, cook, rearrange their bedroom, make a surprise gift for a family member who’s out.
  • Outside – backyard cricket, teach your dog to fetch, garden together, build a treehouse or fort, water pistol or water bomb fights.

Maybe you’ll spend the day planning your next adventure, here are some ideas to get you started…

  • Plan feast – go out to dinner or cook a favourite meal together.
  • Build a backyard Ninja warrior course (and then hold a competition).
  • Go to a sporting event together.
  • Go to an ice-cream shop and enjoy a delicious ice-cream together.
  • Ride bikes at the park or on trails.
  • Go on a visit to the zoo or a wildlife park.
  • Go on a visit to a local museum together.
  • Build a Bike/scooter/skateboard mini jump ramp together.
  • Build and fly a kite together.
  • Go on a bush walk day trip.
  • Go play bowling or mini-golf.
  • Do a photo scavenger hunt! come up with a list of things to capture on a walk. The kids will be happy to discover them and take pictures!
  • Go to the library and read some books together.
  • Build a cubby out of boxes/branches/blankets and spend some time in it reading books or playing.

Tips:

Consider the cost/benefit trade-off of spending time with your children

Investing time and energy in your family will yield enormous benefits.

Resources:

Rough and Tumble Play

Dr Richard Fletcher's YouTube video will explain why a father's involvement with his child, right from birth, is vitally important for the development of a child's brain and emotional stability.