The Thin Red Line

It is important to talk to your child about the challenges they face which may bring negative consequences to their lives in the long term. Listen to some tips by Bruce Robinson, or read the transcript below.

The Thin Red Line

At The Fathering Project we talk about something called the ‘thin red line’: it’s the thin red line between fun and catastrophe.

We want our children to have fun, but it’s quite dangerous out there: a girl wakes up with some guy she barely knows; a friend steps in to help another friend, but because he’s had a bit to drink and so has everybody else, he hits somebody and they hit the ground with a clunk and the next thing you know he’s in jail – there’s been a one punch death. Kids just want to experiment with drugs – they have a shot of something and the next thing you know they’ve got Hepatitis C for the rest of their life.

We want our kids to have fun – they can’t sit at home playing scrabble with mum and dad all night, but there is a thin red line between fun and catastrophe.

I’m going to tell you what I think is the most important thing for kids to avoid that – it’s having the voice of their father in their head. Dad you can’t be there all the time! But you’ve got to be involved in your kid’s life – talk to them about those problems; get them ready for them so that they don’t cross that thin red line.

Tips:

Get help if you are not coping

It’s tempting to put on a brave face and give the impression to your family that you are coping well with work, fathering, or other aspects of your life, even when things are not going great.

Tips:

Create albums with dad

Make a photo album each year for each child.