The importance of open communication

It may prove difficult at times to engage and communicate with your child, especially as they head into their teenage years. Having open communication will help you to have a deeper conversation and let them know you’re there for them. Open communication not only creates a mutual understanding and space to connect, but our research finds it provides great benefits to your child which may surprise you, including: 

  • Improves self esteem and self worth  
  • Improves social engagement 
  • Allows them to have better self control  

This week Dr Bruce Robinson shares his four top tips for open communication. 

Top Tips For Open Communication  

  • When you communicate, choose a time where you are side by side doing day-to-day things. For example, walking the dog, doing the dishes, driving them to school.  
  • Stay up to date with their daily life including their friends, school, social life.  
  • Talk regularly about a range of topics, don’t ask questions about the same thing.  
  • Always be open and ready for the momens when they want to talk.  

Take important notice of when teachable and troubled moments arise. This is defined by a moment which isn’t forced and has happened organically, allowing you time to provide them some guidance. Ensure you are also aware of troubled moments, for example, an issue with their school or friends; always be ready to talk and engage with your child when this occurs even if you’re busy.  

Try these open communication tips from Bruce and let us know how you go. For further information, this topic is also covered in our Fathering Fundamentals course here.

Mondays with Fathering Project founder Dr. Bruce Robinson
We want to foster connection, sharing, and collaborating in this time of isolation and need. The Fathering Channel is an online community hub and a source of research-based advice, support, and information. Tune in every Monday for Bruce’s weekly video – packed with fathering advice and tips.
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